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National Trust Days Out in The Lake District

When staying at our campsite, make sure you enjoy one of the many National Trust days out in The Lake District.

If you’re visiting the national park on holiday you cannot fail to miss the silver National Trust plaques that are dotted throughout the area. This is due to the fact that the Trust owns or has covenant over about a quarter of the land within the Park. The recognisable oak leaves and acorn logo signifying that an attraction or location is part of the  National Trust is never too far away.

Cockshott Point National Trust Sign

If you have National Trust membership you can discounts at any of the attractions and venues mentioned below. If you haven’t, you may be tempted to sign up once you see what’s on offer. Here we take a look at some of the best family days out they have for visitors.

Map showing National Trust Attractions in The Lake District.

Sizergh estate

Located just to the south of Kendal lies the stunning medieval house and gardens which makes up the Sizergh estate. Unusually, this particular property is still lived in by members of the Strickland family. This fact is clearly evident to visitors as there are modern family photos interspersed with the old painting of the family’s ancestors.

The gardens and surrounding grounds are fantastic to wander around. The open fields used for grazing are a great place to exercise your dog on the lead. The floral carpet which flows down the stone staircase and the more recently created stumpery are little gems to see and are bound to capture younger visitors imagination. We think any fairies would love to call either of these places home.

When you get the call for a cuppa, the large cafe offers welcome respite. They serve a delicious menu of food and drinks here, much of it locally sourced.

 

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Fell Foot

A short distance from our campsite is the lovely family friendly area at the southern tip of Windermere known as Fell Foot. Here there are sweeping lawns which are perfect for burning some energy off by running about and playing games. There is also a great adventure playground and a tree trail around the park. For a slower pace, the green space here is equally suitable for picnics or to saunter around on a gentle walk.

There is also easy lakeside access here for paddling, swimming and water craft. Rowing boats and kayaks are available to hire between April and October.

 

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Hill Top

Any fan of Beatrix Potter should pay a visit to Fell Foot. The 17th century farmhouse formally owned by the famous author was given to over to The Trust following her death in 1943 along with 14 other farms she owned in the area.

Hill Top was Beatrix’s most beloved place. It was her spiritual home and where she found inspiration for some of her most iconic tales. Full of her precious things, Hill Top encapsulates her passion that went on to dominate her life, preserving the landscape and culture of the Lakes. From traditional Lakeland furniture, to trophies for her prize-winning Herdwick sheep, Hill Top represents her legacy.

The colourful garden is just as Beatrix knew it. Today, the National Trust continues in Beatrix’s footsteps, working in a changing world to help conserve the area.

 

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Wray Castle

Take a trip up from our park towards Ambleside and follow signs to Wray Castle. This Gothic style castle was built around 180 years ago with interior designs more commonly found in churches. Head up the towers and take in the panoramic Lake District views from the many windows around the building.

Outside the castle you can continue to find wonderfully framed views of the lake and the surrounding fells. Take a stroll around the circular walks from the car park which lead down to the shores of Windermere. For younger visitors there is an excellently equipped outdoor adventure play area to explore.

The National Trust have recently constructed a jetty on the banks under the castle allowing you to arrive in style by boat from Ambleside. This is particularly handy in the summer when the limited car parking spaces can become full quite quickly.

 

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Sticklebarn and The Langdales

If you love the outdoors as much as refuelling with food and drink, then Sticklebarn is going to be a heavenly destination for you.

Located in the centre of many walking routes around The Langdales, and with hearty food, real ale and roaring fires, this is the perfect place to eat, drink and relax after a day on the fells.

Major peaks await walkers with towering ambitions, however it’s not all about scrambling amongst the high fells. The circular route around Blea Tarn is easily accessible, with views of Little and Great Langdale. High Close Estate and Arboretum is also a great place to head to. Here you can wander around rare trees from around the globe.

 

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Steam Yacht Gondola

Take a step back in time and take a trip The National Trust’s Steam Yacht Gondola. The vessel is a rebuilt Victorian steam-powered yacht located on Coniston Water. Originally launched in 1859, she was built for the steamer service carrying passengers from the Furness Railway and the Coniston Railway.

You can book to take the head of the lake cruise which lasts around 45 minutes or the full lake cruise which is 1 hour and 45 minutes. On both trips the knowledgable crew provide a commentary on some of Coniston’s famous connections and the history of the lake.

Tickets start from £12 for adults and £6 for children. Dogs are welcome on the outer decks of the gondola.

 

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Claife Viewing Station

Whilst staying at out campsite in the Lake District, you should take the time to make the short trip across the lake from Bowness Bay and stroll along the lakeshore to the courtyard cafe. Walk up to Claife Viewing Station and you’ll be greeted with a fantastic sight down the lake through the stain glass framed window. It’s a perfect short trip out for the family.

For a longer day out you can extend your walk along the western shore onto Claife. Make sure that you finish with a treat back at the cafe – the cakes are delicious.

 

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